Buildings

map-1854
1854 Ordnance Survey plan.
Reproduced with the permission of the National Library of Scotland.

The oldest building on the site is the 1816 warehouse building in the north-west corner.  To it was then attached an engine shed (current chimney added later) and factory, as can be seen in the 1854 Ordnance Survey plan.

To the east is a house and garden, facing onto Pilmuir Street.  In the centre is largely laid out as gardens, possibly attached to Railside Cottage (south-west corner).

It was in 1849 that Andrew Reid successfully established the use of steam powered looms on the site, the first in Dunfermline to do so. By 1860, there were 200 power looms in operation at Pilmuir.  Activity would appear to have been concentrated in this north-west corner of the current site until the later 19th century, when substantial expansion began, although some work was done (it is unclear what) by Robertson and Orchar (a Dundee-based mill-engineer and textile machinery manufacturing partnership with an architectural department) in the 1860s.

map-1894-s
1894 Ordnance Survey plan.
Reproduced with the permission of the National Library of Scotland.

The period 1883-1901 saw expansion on a massive scale.  The architect was Thomas Hyslop Ure and he designed the Pilmuir Street elevation, a 28 bay, 3 storey Italianate frontage to the site.

It was also during this period that the curved southern range of buildings were erected.  They bear the date 1893 but are not visible on the 1894 Ordnance Survey plan, the survey for it surely have been done just to early to pick up this change.

Still present in the south-west corner was Railside Cottage.  The 1894 plan suggests it was outwith the Pilmuir Works boundary. It seems to have survived until at least the 1960s/1970s when it was photographed by John Hume.